Wednesday, March 5, 2008

Summary & Response: Arizona Weighs Bill to Allow Guns on Campuses



On a daily basis, most college students don't know what situation they will face other than listening to a professor talk about something really boring, much less having to worry about someone walking into a class and start shooting. Law makers in Arizona and other states like Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan and Virginia, are trying to have a law passed that will allow students, teachers and other faculty members at colleges and universities to carry [licensed] firearms (guns); for a sense of protection.

Let's think about this entire situation very carefully. Personally, I wouldn't want to have guns on campus, first off, it will bring more crime onto the campus, second, you don't know the situation that that student or faculty member is facing and third, it's not sending the right message to the younger students (K-12) about how college will or should be. No matter what college or university you may attend, there is crime (just read your schools newspaper and you'll find some type of crime). Allowing guns on campus will rise the crime rate; more car robberies, car jacking, assault in the dorm rooms, and possibly confrontations in the school eateries. I believe law makers need to really focuse on what they are proposing and not just look at the situation through their eyes. It should be looked through a student's point of view and mainly a parent's point of view.

There is enough problems on campuse throughout American. We don't need this [allowing guns] to be added to the problems already at hand.

Questions from page 331-32
Is there really a problem here that needs to be solved?
Yes. The problem is allowing students to carry guns on campus. Solution: it should not be allowed. Simple! This problem will not only effect the colleges and universities in America, it effect the elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools.

Will the proposed solution really solve this problem?
I don’t believe allowing students and faculty members to have licensed weapons on campus will solve the problem. It will give those students that are having [mental] problems a better way to take their frustrations out on those around them whether if they are stressed from school, having family issues, or having confusion with other students.

Can the problem be solved more simply without disturbing the status quo?
I believe it can be solved without disturbing the status quo. If we enforce more security on campuses and really evaluate each student that goes to a college or a university, then there wont be any reason to allow students with guns on campus.

Is the proposed solution really practical? Does it stand a chance of actually being enacted?
Once again, I don’t believe the proposed solution is practical because, law makers are allowing 17 year-old to 22 year-old to use guns when the majority of them don’t (and probably won’t) use a gun. I don’t think it will be enacted because, there will be [concerned] parents, relatives and so forth, wanting to know why their child(ren) are taking guns to school when the campus is supposed to be a learning environment, a safe environment, not a place of worry.

What will be the unforeseen positive and negative consequences?
I am going to be honest, I don’t find anything positive much less unforeseen in this situation. I’m not going to say “Allowing the students to have the guns, will give them a sense of security” when I know that that will be a lie [in my mind]. But for the negative, I believe they would (or will) be everything I mentioned before and possibly more. It won’t send a positive message to those who are entering college, [concerned] parents will be worried and mainly, no one knows what another person is feeling or thinking when they are sitting in class next to a classmate who is having problems.

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Implicit Argument: Let It Enfold You

Even though an explicit argument states a controversial claim directly and supports it with reasons and evidence, an implicit argument is completely different. An implicit argument doesn't look like an argument, its more in the form or poetry, short stories, art, personal essays, etc. It's indirectly stated.


Let It Enfold You by Charles Bukowski is an example of an implicit argument. There are sections of this poem that grabbed my attention in many different ways. In the poem for example, when he writes "I entered the world once more, drove down the hill past the houses full and empty of people...," he is saying that there are homes filled with luxurious and expensive items (that other people aren't blessed to have) aren't being enjoyed by the person(s) that have aquired those things. I also believe that the homes are sometimes for show. Meaning, they will only get used for major functions or big parties and so forth.

Bukowski writes how he is different from everyone else but finally realizes, he is just like everyone else.

to be continued...

Monday, January 14, 2008

New York Times

i know professor drake wants us to pick up a copy of the nytimes but you can also subscribe to their website at http://www.nytimes.com/gst/regi.html. just trying to help!